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yechida's reflections
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TOPIC: yechida's reflections 76480 Views

Re: yechida's reflections 08 Sep 2019 01:08 #343415

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Last Edit: 08 Sep 2019 01:14 by yechidah.

Re: yechida's reflections 08 Sep 2019 10:36 #343423

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Encouragement in Teshuva of Bein Adam Lechaviero

Many get disheartened by the fact that while Hashem forgives (with teshuva) all sins done against Him, He does not forgive sins between man  and his fellow man.This cause many people anguish as they regret their past behaviors that hurt others but wither do not have the opportunity to ask forgiveness or lacks the courage to do so.

Rav Kook in his Oros Hateshuva give us hope & perspective & advice in regards to this.Alot (but not all) what is written below is brought down there

It is true that full forgiveness can only happen when the person you hurt forgives you. And a person should do what he or she can to break their ego & pride & ask forgiveness .

But while the courage is not yet there this is what you do 

1) Ask Hashem to forgive you for the aspect of the  sin against HIM.  Loshon Horah or hurting someone is also a sin against HIM. So with true teshuva , Hashem forgives you for that aspect of the Loshen Horah  which weakens the sin greatly even if the aspect of "bein adom lechavero" is still there. Nevertheless, the sin is very much weakened.

2) Tell Hashem in your prayers that you deeply regret hurting His children. Ask Him for courage to correct by asking forgiveness. And in the meantime Ask Hashem to place in the heart of the friend you hurt to forgive you & for Hashem to be compassionate towards you while you make these efforts even if you didn't get muster the courage to actually ask forgiveness

3) Forgive a person who as hurt you even if he/she didn't ask you forgiveness.Then tell Hashem that while you understand that ideally you need to ask forgiveness from someone you hurt, but in the meantime to ask Hashem to soften your friend's heart towards you so that he will forgive you. Here there is a midda kneged middah. Just as you forgave others, you ask Hashem to open up the hearts of others to forgive you

4)Going forward, pray for the welfare of the one you hurt & his family & actively find ways to help him/her . This is very powerful because Hashem now sees in a very active & tangible way that you deeply regret your past mistakes of hurting this other person. This will assist that you muster the courage to ask forgiveness and /or this person will forgive you on their own

Don't allow yourself to get discouraged even if you haven't yet fully kept your obligation to ask forgiveness from someone you have hurt. It's not all  or nothing. These efforts listed above have great value in sweetening judgments & getting to the point to where you will actually be able to do what you need to do
Last Edit: 08 Sep 2019 11:23 by yechidah.

Re: yechida's reflections 15 Sep 2019 11:03 #343564

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wishing you all a wonderful week!!

Dvar Torah-Tavo

https://guardyoureyes.com/media/kunena/attachments/2149/tavoi-5779.pdf
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Last Edit: 15 Sep 2019 11:07 by yechidah.

Re: yechida's reflections 15 Sep 2019 15:43 #343567

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Dvar Torah from Rav Kook ztl

The Torah portion opens and closes with the same theme: simchah, joy. It begins with the mitzvah of offering bikkurim (first-fruits) in the Temple, an exercise in appreciating what God has given us, as it says,



“You shall rejoice in all the good that the Lord your God has granted you and your family” (Deut. 26:11).


Afterwards, the Torah describes the terrible trials that will befall the Jewish people if they are unfaithful to the Torah’s teachings. This section concludes with the root cause for these punishments:



“Because you did not serve the Lord your God with joy (simchah) and contentment (tuv leivav).” (Deut. 28:47)


Not only does God expect us to keep the mitzvot, but we are to perform them with joy and contentment. What is the difference between these two emotions?

Joy and Contentment

Simchah and tuv leivav are two distinct levels of happiness. Interestingly, they are the result of contradictory perceptions.

What is the source of tuv leivav? This is a sense of satisfaction that we feel good about our service of God. We pray, study Torah, and perform mitzvot out of a feeling that we are doing what we were created to do. As one of God’s creations, it is natural for us to serve Him. We are grateful to have been blessed with the intellectual and spiritual capabilities needed to worship Him through Torah study and mitzvot.

Simchah, on the other hand, comes from the perception that some unexpected boon has befallen us. We feel joy in serving God when we are aware of the tremendous privilege in being able to connect to God — a gift far beyond our true level. Awareness of this amazing gift, while at the same time feeling that our service is appropriate and suitable, allows us to feel both simchah and tuv leivav.

Cultivating Joy

How does one attain this simchah in serving God? The secret to developing and enhancing our sense of joy is to reflect on two thoughts:


  • Appreciating the significance and wonder of every medium - such as Torah study and mitzvot — that allows us to connect with the Master of the universe.

  • Recognizing the Divine source of our soul and its inherent holiness, even though it may have become soiled through contact with the material world.


We experience genuine joy in serving God when we are able to thoroughly internalize these two insights

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